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<FONT size=3>'''Truth through scrutiny.'''</FONT> <FONT size=3>'''Truth through scrutiny.'''</FONT>
-"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie -- deliberate, contrived and dishonest -- but the myth -- persistent, persuasive and unrealistic." -- John F. Kennedy+'''"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie -- deliberate, contrived and dishonest -- but the myth -- persistent, persuasive and unrealistic." -- John F. Kennedy
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<font face="QuickType Mono" size="3"><strong>Welcome to Media Mythbusters --</strong></font> <font face="QuickType Mono" size="2">In order to make even the most mundane of everyday decisions it is necessary to have good information. The American public depends on television, radio and print media to deliver to them reliable and accurate information. Most of the time, the American media does their job and the result is an informed public. Other times, however, the information relayed to the American public is not neither reliable nor accurate. <font face="QuickType Mono" size="3"><strong>Welcome to Media Mythbusters --</strong></font> <font face="QuickType Mono" size="2">In order to make even the most mundane of everyday decisions it is necessary to have good information. The American public depends on television, radio and print media to deliver to them reliable and accurate information. Most of the time, the American media does their job and the result is an informed public. Other times, however, the information relayed to the American public is not neither reliable nor accurate.

Revision as of 18:21, 10 March 2007

Media Myth Busters

Truth through scrutiny.

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie -- deliberate, contrived and dishonest -- but the myth -- persistent, persuasive and unrealistic." -- John F. Kennedy

Welcome to Media Mythbusters -- In order to make even the most mundane of everyday decisions it is necessary to have good information. The American public depends on television, radio and print media to deliver to them reliable and accurate information. Most of the time, the American media does their job and the result is an informed public. Other times, however, the information relayed to the American public is not neither reliable nor accurate.

The goal of this site is to serve as a reliable resource providing news consumers with examples of stories in which major media outlets have failed to provide the public with good information., Posted here will be tools and information to allow consumers to determine how best to process information they receive through the media. The Media Mythbuster Mission can be found at this link.

Media Malpractice --

Fake photography scandals (dubbed "fauxtography" by some bloggers) are examples of media malpractice. The photograph below was taken by Adnan Hajj and was distributed worldwide by Reuters in August 2006. The smoke seen billowing from what was described as an Israeli air raid on Beirut’s suburbs was digitally altered, as it appears were some of the buildings in the photo. Charles Johnson of the blog, Little Green Footballs, first noticed the suspicious smoke and later uncovered additional instances of "fauxtography" coming out of the Middle East.

[Photo to be inserted here.]


Index of Case Studies in Media Malpractice

Index of Case Studies in Media Malpractice -- The entries listed here are summaries of stories that appeared in major media outlets, print and broadcast, in which media malpractice may have occurred. In the case of each separate reported event, facts are presented in the form of evidence of what is known, along with that evidence which is less certain or unknown, to serve as a guide to further investigation and research. In this way, the reader can disentangle the web of allegations on an issue, and better judge for him or herself the incident(s), the relative positions, and whether media malpractice occurred. The cases presented are selected for their recent or current importance, or telling illustration of wider and/or longer-lasting problems.


List of Suspect/Discredited Sources

List of Suspect/Discredited Sources -- These are names of sources cited in major media stories who have been discredited or discovered to be non-existent.


Contributors

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